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Norwegian wolves threatens to once again come under the fly-hunters

Norwegian wolves threatens to once again come under the fly-hunters When they were on December 20 last year at the last minute by the Norwegian government withdrawn the license for shooting wolves, it looked like a significant victory for Nature Conservation. Joy international and local associations, led by the environmental organization Friends of the Earth, however, does not last long. The law, which since 1971 ensures the protection of wolves, in fact may very quickly end up being fundamental changes. And wolves nothing good does not follow. Reports on the daily Indenpedent.

Just a reminder: Do not counted in November, the Norwegian Government that issues licenses to be shot 47 wolves on their territory. Norwegian wolf population at that time numbered only about 68 specimens. The government should authorize this step because regulatory culling 70% of the local population, which would practically lead to its liquidation. The decision raised significant backlash, either among conservationists in Norway and throughout Europe. Petitions, open letters to the government and various proclamation took care of that, less than three days before the hunt, the number of licenses issued is reduced to the originally planned 18 pieces. Currently has eight of the 18 wolves blasted. The question remains, what will happen with the other Norwegian wolves away.

Although since 2015 still included in the Norwegian list of endangered animals (as critically endangered) and also fall under the protection Naturmangfoldloven, therefore, the main Norwegian Nature Conservation Act, have won decisively. Now strong legislation, which now gives them at least some sort of guarantee of survival, could achieve change. Draft amendments to the law would significantly expand the opportunities that would justify shooting wolves. At present, for example, shooting wolves (outside the system of State awarded the licenses and the grace period) allowed livestock producers when it comes to the direct protection of their herds. If a pack of wolves attacking sheep in a corral or pasture, their owner can shoot the wolves to avoid direct threat (and need not wait for any official permits).

Such a possibility for the defense is the "inevitable" and Naturmangfoldloven allows it. Worse, the draft new amendment to the law could under certain specific conditions expanded the possibilities blast, inter alia because of cultural traditions or for recreational purposes. In other words, the clause indirectly approving routine blasting wolves would become a direct part of the Nature Conservation Act. Prepared a legal text also offers a specific case "by" Supplement "For example, if the wolves show up as a potentially significant threat to the herds of elk, who are in Norway behavior and over-hunted, administrators will be able to occupation of the territory against predators intervene."

The law thus theoretically in this example are not necessarily the wolves, but to "force protection traditionally hunted elk", though the wolves of that definitely comes out well. Appendix would be applied across the board, even in territories where wolves are still tolerated or defended. In a similar situation would render themselves bears, lynx and wolverines. Proposal officially last Friday gave Norwegian Minister for Climate and Environment Vidar Helgesen, apparently under pressure from livestock and hunters. They, just like last December, conservationists have now managed to unite opinions. "But it is virtually impossible to say how many wolves would be after the adoption of the amendment of the Act could be killed," Helgesen said during a press conference in Oslo. "It could be a small number. But what is a small number? "

A controversial amendment to the law is currently being considered by the Norwegian Parliament and conservationists yet certainly not silent. "Modify Nature Conservation Act to allow shooting even more species of endangered animals, it is absolutely unacceptable," says Nina Jensen, for example, the head of WWF Norway. "Especially in a country that is considered environmentally advanced." Local journalists have so far agree that the amendment in Parliament does not find sufficient support, except for the traditionally right-wing and agrarian parties. Still, they all remember that in the early nineties, remained in Scandinavia only about ten wolves, and thanks to rigorous protection of their numbers went somewhere to number 430 pieces. And that would be enough little to the wolves came back to zero.

Author: Radomír Dohnal
Source: Ekolist.cz



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